Author Archives: René Bösch

The New Swiss Prospectus Regime

In June 2018 the Swiss Federal Parliament passed the Financial Services Act and the Financial Institutions Act, and on 6 November 2019 the Swiss Federal Council published the implementing ordinances thereto. The acts and the related ordinances will become effective on 1 January 2020. Modeled largely after the EU prospectus framework, the new prospectus regime marks a veritable paradigm change to Swiss capital market regulation, introducing a number of novelties for issuers of securities in the Swiss market, such as the requirement for an ex ante approval for most financial instruments, coupled with some important long-awaited explicit exemptions from such requirement and the requirement for a prospectus for secondary public offerings.

By Christian Rehm / René Bösch (Reference: CapLaw-2019-51)

Discontinuation of LIBOR and Swiss Law-Governed Legacy Bonds – Time to Take a Closer Look

LIBOR was – and still is – the dominant reference rate for CHF-denominated floating rate and other variable interest rate bonds. There is still a significant number of outstanding “legacy bonds” with such variable interest rates that have maturities beyond the end of 2021, the announced time for the discontinuation of LIBOR. This article discusses considerations for issuers and bondholder representatives in dealing with such “legacy bonds”.

By René Bösch / Eduard De Zordi / Benjamin Leisinger / Lee Saladino (Reference: CapLaw-2019-28)

Replacement of LIBOR – An Approach for the Swiss retail lending market

The discontinuation of LIBOR, announced for the end of 2021, is foreseeable. At the same time, for lack of suitable alternatives, LIBOR is still the dominant reference rate in the Swiss retail lending market for floating rate borrowings. As a result, Swiss banks active in the mortgage lending market already now face the challenge to provide for a transition to a successor rate when entering into new contracts. And the same challenge exists generally, both in the retail and the institutional market.

By René Bösch / Benedikt Maurenbrecher (Reference: CapLaw-2019-04)

The New Swiss Prospectus Regime

In June 2018 the Swiss Federal Parliament passed the Financial Services Act and the Financial Institutions Act, and on 23 October 2018 the Swiss Federal Council presented the ordinances implementing these acts for public consultation until early February 2019. It is expected that the acts and its ordinances will become effective on 1 January 2020. Modeled largely after the EU prospectus framework, the new prospectus regime marks a veritable paradigm change to Swiss capital market regulation, introducing a number of novelties for issuers of securities in the Swiss market, such as the requirement for an ex ante approval for most financial instruments, coupled with some important long-awaited explicit exemptions from such requirement and the requirement for a prospectus for secondary public offerings.

By Christian Rehm / René Bösch (Reference: CapLaw-2018-56)

Basel III Implementation in Switzerland: Leverage Ratio and Liquidity

As of 1 January 2018, further elements of the Basel III international regulatory framework for banks on capital and liquidity entered into effect in Switzerland. Notably, the unweighted capital adequacy requirement (leverage ratio) was extended from systemically relevant banks to all banks by requiring a minimum core capital (Tier 1 capital) to total exposure ratio of 3%. As of the same date, the liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) requirement were adjusted to provide for certain simplifications, which will primarily benefit smaller financial institutions. The risk diversification requirements of Basel III measured against Tier 1 capital will enter into effect in Switzerland in 2019. The introduction of the net stable funding ratio (NSFR), which was originally planned for 1 January 2018, has been postponed.

By René Bösch / Benjamin Leisinger / Lee Saladino (Reference: CapLaw-2018-03)

The Financial Stability Board published its Guiding Principles on iTLAC

On 6 July 2017, the Financial Stability Board published its guiding principles on the loss-absorbing resources to be committed to subsidiaries or sub-groups that are located in host jurisdictions and deemed material for the resolution of a G-SIB as a whole (iTLAC). The guiding principles support the implementation of the iTLAC requirement in each host jurisdiction and provide guidance on the size and composition of the iTLAC requirement, cooperation and coordination between home and host authorities and the trigger mechanism for iTLAC.

By René Bösch / Benjamin Leisinger / Lee Saladino (Reference: CapLaw-2017-45)

The Proposed New Swiss Prospectus Regime – An Interim Report

In December 2016, the Swiss Council of States as the first chamber of Swiss parliament discussed the proposed Financial Services Act. If enacted as currently drafted, the act will impose new requirements on financial services providers and introduce a new Swiss prospectus regime. Modeled largely after the EU prospectus framework, the new prospectus regime will be a veritable paradigm change to Swiss capital market regulation, introducing a number of novelties for issuers of securities in the Swiss market, such as the requirement for an ex ante approval for most financial instruments, coupled with some important long-awaited explicit exemptions from such requirement and the requirement for a prospectus for secondary public offerings. Compared to the draft proposed by the Swiss Federal Council, the Swiss Council of States made a few well-received amendments, but some important issues still remain that would warrant reconsideration.

By Christian Rehm / René Bösch (Reference: CapLaw-2017-01)

The Proposed New Swiss Prospectus Regime – A First Analysis

On 4 November 2015, the Swiss Federal Council adopted the draft Financial Services Act and submitted it to the Swiss Parliament. If enacted as proposed, it will impose new requirements on financial services providers and will introduce a new Swiss prospectus regime. Modeled largely after the EU prospectus framework, the new prospectus regime will be a veritable paradigm change to Swiss capital market regulation, introducing a number of novelties for issuers of securities in the Swiss market, such as the requirement for an ex ante approval for most financial instruments, coupled with some important long-awaited explicit exemptions from such requirement and the requirement for a prospectus for secondary public offerings.

By Christian Rehm / René Bösch (Reference: CapLaw-2016-1)

TLAC – The FSB Issues the Final Principles and Final Term Sheet

On 9 November 2015, the Financial Stability Board finalized its Principles on Loss-absorbing and Recapitalisation Capacity of G-SIBs in Resolution, including the Total Loss-absorbing Capacity (TLAC) Term Sheet. It introduces a new international standard for quantitative and qualitative requirements for external and internal TLAC as well as new disclosure requirements.

By René Bösch / Benjamin Leisinger (Reference: CapLaw-2015-58)

Revisions to the Draft Financial Services Act and Draft Financial Institutions Act by the Swiss Federal Council

Following a review of the consultation results on the draft Financial Services Act (FinSA) and the draft Financial Institutions Act (FinIA), the Swiss Federal Council decided that certain elements needed to be revised and the dispatch for submission to the Swiss Parliament be postponed until the end of 2015.

By René Bösch / Benjamin Leisinger (Reference: CapLaw-2015-33)